Friday Favorites

Happy Friday! 

Everyone seems to be in full-on holiday mode now.  Our tree is up, cards are arriving from friends and family (I do love a holiday card, don’t you?) and the annual Christmas Concert in Bermuda, Joy to the World is happening over this weekend.  That’s where you’ll find me.  Otherwise, I’ll be sending off the last of the gifts, doing some shopping and spending a little extra time at the gym to counteract last night’s Eggnog social! What about you?  Do you have a favorite holiday tradition or are you counting the seconds until it’s all over?  Either way, here are a few entertaining Friday Favorites for your reading and shopping pleasure this weekend!

Have you heard of The Melodica Men?  They are hilarious.  Here they are, playing The Nutcracker

If you have company coming for the holidays and need to spruce the place up a little bit, Target is having a Big 25% off Home Sale.  Use the code GIFT.

They have great artwork by Kate Pugsley

Help your guests keep warm with these pretty color block throws.

And these carafes are great, whether you’re serving hot cider at a party, or morning coffee for a houseful of guests.  

Remember Festivus?  Do you celebrate?  

this commercial still gets me every time I watch it.  The life-changing effects of giving a child the gift of music lessons. 

I have recently discovered the perfection of the jumpsuit as replacement for the concert gown.  They are easy, comfortable, flattering on all body types, and you won’t be worried about tripping over any dress hems while walking on stage (one of my biggest nightmares).  Here are a few good ones:

by Jonathan Simkai, Trina Turk, Solace London, and Hallston

Check out this guide to hanging out in Providence, RI during the holidays from fellow blogger Jess Kirby’s site. 

Some very good news! Violinist Rachel Barton Pine is launching a major new project dedicated to highlighting and promoting music by Black composers, including an 8-volume series of sheet music books for violin (with similar books for other instruments in the plans).  This has been a lifelong passion of Rachel’s for most of her life, and I’m so happy to see this come to fruition! Check out this article about it all from Strings Magazine.

For my Boston readers: Here is THE concert listing site for the city.  Do you have “attend a holiday concert” on your bucket list, but can’t afford the pricey Pops ticket, and your pink tutu is at the dry cleaners?  There are literally dozens and dozens of fantastic concerts happening around the city over the next few weeks.

ICYMI: Some posts from the past couple of weeks:

Finding Our Tribe as Classical Musicians

Gift Guide for the person who HATES the cold: or a “how to survive winter” guide.

How to Balance Practicing & Homework

Spotlight Series: Tracy Friedlander

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cheers! and have a great weekend, everyone!  

-Kate

 

Finding Our Tribe as Classical Musicians

I feel like every time I turn around, someone is talking about “finding your tribe”, and offering how-tos, advice and new podcasts.  There are 10 new books out on Amazon this week with the word “Tribe” in the title.  So, what, exactly, is this tribe and why do we classical musicians need to find it so desperately?

It’s not terribly complicated, actually. Your tribe is the group of people you spend most of your time with.  They could be your office co-workers, or teammates, or, if you’re running a business, your tribe might be your customer base—the people you want to reach out to and communicate to-the people who are interested in what you offer.  But as a regular person, your tribe is simply your group of close friends.  Your besties. Your community. Your squad. Those people that you consider family–even though you’re not actually related to (thank god!).  But here’s the thing.  Finding our tribe as classical musicians is something I think we are pretty bad at in general, and I think we suffer a lot for it.

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We grow up spending way too much time alone in a practice room.  In fact, unlike on a sports team, if your friends are in the room with you when you’re honing your craft, you’re doing it wrong. I was lucky that growing up, I had a group of close friends who were all classical musicians.  We were all good, we were all serious, and we all needed to practice.  We’d call each other on practice breaks (and boy, was it ever exciting when they came out with 3-way calling!) or meet over at our community music center after school and steal rooms to practice in. We were close, we were supportive, but we were also ultra-competitive.  I once won a competition and a couple of my closest, dearest friends said the most HORRIBLE things about me and how I clearly didn’t deserve to win.  They said these things loudly and publicly and here I am, almost 3 decades later, unable to forget that harsh, unexpected sting of betrayal.  I think I had some major trust issues with my friendships for years after that, and really, those past relationships still haven’t completely healed. 

These days, the idea of building a strong, supportive community of people is a priority for me.  I strive for it in my personal life with my own close friendships, and it’s the cornerstone of this blog–a place to share ideas, advice, successes and failures with a larger community of people–from the high school students hoping to get into a certain summer festival to the seasoned professionals who find themselves spending too many hours alone on airplanes and hotel rooms. We’re all in this together, folks.

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The truth is, being a musician means that we are vulnerable.  We put ourselves out there on a daily basis, and that is scary as hell.  And while, in order to improve and grow, we need a fairly steady stream of critical feedback, we also need people in our lives who we can depend on to be our cheerleaders no matter what.  Even if they were on the other side of that win.

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These days, I am lucky enough to have an incredible group of friends.  Several of them live spread out around the US, and even though I only get to see them maybe once a year or so, we always just pick up where we left off. I have a super close-knit group who are all in Boston (shout out to my laydeez!), and I get to see them whenever I’m in town.  We know what is going on in each other’s lives.  We go to each other’s concerts whenever we can, or at least try to send a “good luck!” text.  I’ll admit, we could be better.  We could have each other’s backs a little more.  But I think that we’re all just so accustomed to doing our own thing.  Our success as musicians has always depended upon our own private work–done alone–in a practice room.  We were all raised to be a bunch of competitive loners pitting ourselves against each other.  But I’ve learned over the years that a colleague’s success does not mean I will be less successful.  It’s not a zero-sum game here, folks. 

So let’s step it up a little bit, shall we? Think about your closest friends.  Musicians? Writers? Accountants? Whatever they do, treat their successes as if  they were your successes and celebrate wildly with them.  Make their goals your goals and help them get what they need.  Hopefully, when it’s your turn, they will return the favor.

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Welcome to the tribe!

Kate

Gift Guide for the person who HATES the cold: or a “how to survive winter” guide.

I grew up in Chicago, and then I moved to Boston, where I spent the majority of my adult years before moving to Bermuda.  I hated winter.  Passionately.  I didn’t like being cold, and I was ALWAYS cold.  One year it occurred to me that I wasn’t really doing it right, and I was spending 1/3 of every year being cranky and miserable.  I learned to love the traditions of winter–rewarding myself with a hot chocolate when I went to dig out the car, investing in a good down coat and some other cold-winter gear, and trying to take a cue from mother nature and slow down a bit.  It worked. I actually started to look forward to winter’s arrival (though, let’s be honest here, I also promptly found myself a boyfriend who lived in Bermuda).  Anyway….. here are a few of my favorites.  I hope that you all have a wonderful season full of warm bowls of steaming soup, roaring fires and toasty knitwear.  Now go pour yourself a cup of cinnamon tea, curl up in this and read on.

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Books to inspire you to hunker down and get your cozy on:

Cookbooks: On Baking Bread, from Molly Yeh (she went to Juilliard, ya know!), or some Vegetarian Comfort Food

Hygge Books: On basic winter-survival, family traditions, or finally learn how to knit

And to help dream of sunnier weather:

Gardening books , India Hicks’s Island House is amazing! or just to plan a trip.

These lights are supposed to really help with those winter blues!

I suppose the most obvious thing would be for them to travel to a warmer climate!  Target just came out with a new travel collection that I am kind of obsessed with right now.  The suitcases are great, but the packable backpack is perfect for when you’re traveling for a concert and you need to wear your instrument on your back, BUT, you know you’re going to want to take advantage of a nice day hike while you’re there?

But the best way to get through a cold and brutal winter is to embrace it and arm yourself accordingly.

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Shearling slippers are a must.  The ultimate in coziness.

Crawling into a bed made up with flannel sheets is the BEST when it’s cold out!  Some simple ones, a more seasonal set, or these super festive ones (for you or the kiddos).

If I had this hat, I would spend my entire days frolicking in the snow.  Of course, if I could afford that hat, I’d be in Fiji. these earmuffs are a bit more reasonable!

Keep your hands and toes warm–for skiing, winter hikes, or just the daily commute.

Go snowshoeing and then warm up with some hot cocoa!

When I was living in Boston I slipped on ice and broke things (hand, finger, wrist) 3 times in 6 years.  Then I got some Yaktrax, and now I give them to everyone I care about.  Game.Changer.

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