A Few Friday Favorites

 

Happy Friday, Everyone!  What are you up to this weekend?  I have a rehearsal tonight, a wedding tomorrow, and then on Sunday afternoon, I have my last concert of the 2017-2018 Season!  It’s been an incredible year of major growth for me as a cellist, and now I am ready for a bit of a rest.  If you’re looking for something fun to do, read, see, or shop, here are a few of my picks for this week.

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King Street Cookies….mmmm

 

1. With this past week’s horrible news regarding the suicides of  both Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain, let’s all hug our loved ones tight and do our best to be open and available to anyone who might be in need of a friend, a hug or even just a kind word.  If you or anyone you know is struggling, call contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting 741741

2. Speaking of depression, and other mental illnesses, I’m fascinated by Michael Pollan’s latest book about the use of psychedelics as a treatment for depression, anxiety and addiction.  I hope this newly re-opened dialogue will bring about more funding for much-needed research.  I just listened to a great podcast with him about it, and I can’t wait to dive into the book.

3. For something a little bit lighter, how about this?  The Sequel to The Devil Wears Prada.  FINALLY!  It looks deliciously hilarious.

4. As a woman who was single until she was 40, and who decided not to have children, I can definitely relate to this new campaign by SK-II titled #ineverexpire.  It was created to bring awareness to age-related pressures put upon women around the globe.  You can see the short film here, and Grace Atwood wrote a fantastic blog post about it as well.  The comments were amazing.

5. Are you in NYC this weekend?  If you are, you should go see this concert.  I mean, Brahms Clarinet Quintet AND the Brahms B-flat Sextet in one sitting?  I can’t imagine a more luxurious and indulgent concert to get to listen to.  Oh, and it’s the Orchestra of St. Luke’s so you know it’s going to be amazing.

6. Anthropologie is having a big sale this weekend.  Here are a few of my favorites. This crisp white dress, this super fun red one, or this one with just the right kind of flow (also a great cello dress!)

7. Saturday is National Rosé Day!  (Wait, isn’t EVERY DAY Nat’l Rosé day?….)  Uncorked Bermuda is having an epic event in the Botanic Gardens.  Everyone will be wearing various shades of pink.  I have to work, but I might do a sneaky drive by just to see it.  And I already have my bottle of Bermuda’s finest chilling in the fridge.  For those of you who can’t get here to celebrate, here are a few ways you can join in the fun.

this book

this hat

the T-shirt

8. For anyone in or near Charleston, tonight is the last night to hear Pia de’ Tolomei at the Spoleto USA Festival.  It’s being conducted by Lidiya Yankovskaya, who many of you met here on Tales From the Lane a few weeks ago.  It’s getting rave reviews, so go and check it out!

9. Summer is upon us, and the humidity is rising.  Protect your instrument with a silk cello/viola/violin bag.  I couldn’t find anyone who made them for cello, so I asked my mom to make me one.  Now she sells them on etsy and through private orders.  The organic silk keeps the moisture level around the instrument consistent, so even if you are moving between an air-conditioned house, outside, and back into an A/C’d hall, your instrument won’t feel the changes as much.  I highly recommend them!

10.  For those of you (ahem…us?) who were not quite as on the ball about pimping out our outdoor spaces as the clock struck Memorial Day, we have been rewarded by Crate and Barrel with a 50% off  outdoor furniture sale!  YAY!

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Cheers!

~Kate

Spotlight Series: Lidiya Yankovskaya

Recenly, I wrote about the new direction I am taking with this space, and as a part of that, I am excited to introduce my new Spotlight Series.  One Wednesday each month, I will interview a totally fierce, ultra-talented female who is taking the music world by storm. I am going to have a mix of performers, composers, conductors, managers, and other lady bosses who are involved in the classical music world in some way.

 

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Today, we have conductor Lidiya Yankovskaya.   Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, I had the pleasure of meeting Lidiya in Boston a few years ago when we were both doing some work with the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras.  It wasn’t long before she was whisked away to do project after project–collecting kudos and rave reviews everywhere she went.  She is currently serving as Music Director of Chicago Opera Theater, Artistic Director of The Refugee Orchestra Project, and Artistic Director Emeritus/Conductor of Juventus New Music Ensemble.  Here, she talks to us how she prepares for a performance, shares her tips of the trade for traveling and practicing, what advice she would give her 18-year old self, and tells a terrifying story of life in an opera pit!

What is your morning ritual or routine?

LY: Since my schedule varies wildly from day to day, I don’t have a routine (and don’t particularly enjoy having one). However, I generally plan out my schedule (including score study time, etc.) at the beginning of a week for that week or at least for the next few days.  If I don’t have a morning rehearsal, I will generally go jogging, go to the gym or do something else active in the morning.

Must-haves for air-travel?

LY: Scores—airplanes are great for score study.  Bring a big warm scarf/sweater in case the plane is super cold.  Comfortable clothing. Airborne in case I end up next to someone who is sneezing and coughing. Generally, I try to pack as little as humanly possible while traveling.

What was your scariest moment on stage?

LY: Last season, I conducted an opera in which a chorus of women was ‘gathering water’ by scooping clay pitchers over the pit.  Someone in props decided to give them pitchers made out of actual clay, and at one point, the handle of a pitcher broke off as a woman in the chorus did the scooping motion.  The pitcher fell into the pit and shattered directly between a cello and a violist—a few inches to the left or right and it would have fallen on someone’s head or someone’s instrument!!

What has been your most rewarding moment as a musician?

LY: There are so many.  I really love my job and there is nothing like the magic of everything coming together the way you mean for it to in a performance.  Luckily, I get to have this feeling often!

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Practicing: Love it or Hate it?

LY: There are things I love about the study and rehearsal process even more than performances.  It’s exciting to discover something the composer put into the score for the first time, or to come up with a new way to shape a phrase.  Of course, it’s also very rewarding to bring the final product to the audience, but I really love the discovery and musical shaping that takes place as I learn a new piece (or rediscover an old one).

What about when you were a kid?

LY: I liked to practice, but was also very impatient about sitting still for long periods of time.  I would want to work very intensively for about 20 minutes, then get up and do something else, then come back to work.  I came from a musical culture where I was asked to sit at the piano patiently for 3+ hours in order for the practicing to be seen as effective, and I learned to do this over time.  Of course, we now know that it’s actually much more productive to work in shorter spurts.  I do wish someone recognized this when I was a kid and allowed me to take full advantage of the practicing style that was most natural for me.  These days, I find that I’m most productive in 45-minute increments.  Work intensely for 45 mins, take a stretch or grab some water or thing about something else; get back to work.

Who were some of your role models as a young musician?

LY: I had some spectacular teachers.  Probably the most important were my high school piano teachers, the duo-piano pair Vladimir Pleshakov and Elena Winther.  They didn’t really have other students and, after a long solo career in Europe, retired to upstate New York, where they occasionally concertized in their piano museum and concert hall.  Each weekend, I would drive an hour and a half to their home in Hudson, NY and spend an hour with one and then an hour with the other.  They approached music making in an incredibly deep, nuanced, and cross-disciplinary way that has stuck with me throughout my career.  They also had this huge collection of pianos from different periods and different places and had me play all my repertoire on the instrument of that time, which gave incredible insight into the work.

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How old were you when you knew you wanted to be a professional musician?

LY: Although I studied music very seriously my entire childhood, I didn’t think I would pursue it professionally.  I toyed with the idea of getting a conservatory piano degree, but realized that I wanted to study other things and also that sitting alone in a practice room for so many hours a day was not for me.  In college, I studied music, philosophy and languages, but realized that music was the one thing I couldn’t live without.  By the end of my time in college, I realized that conducting was the most natural path for me, and a perfect way to combine my various skills and interests.

Have any pre-concert rituals?

LY: Relax, stretch, eat lots of food and drink lots of water to energize for a performance. When possible, I like to go for a long jog or do something else active to clear my head in the afternoon the day of a concert.

Favorite city to perform in?

LY: I like variety.  Each city has something different to offer, and it’s often the city you least expect that is the best place to stay for a short while and that has the most enthusiastic audience.

What is the hardest part of being on the road?

LY: Not having loved ones with you.

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What advice would you give to your 18-year old self?

LY: You have lots of time—don’t feel that you have to have everything figured out now.  Also, sometimes, sleep is more important than fitting in every single thing you want to learn and accomplish; sometimes resting more will allow you to take more advantage of what life has to offer, not less!

If you could have dinner with any classical musician, dead or alive, who would you choose, and what would you ask them about?

LY: Mendelssohn—he was such an incredible overall musician and human being.  Mahler—how did he really want his symphonies to sound?  Wagner—I’d be curious to learn how such a seemingly horrible person could be reconciled with such superb music.  Anton Rubinshteyn—he accomplished so much in his lifetime, basically building a classical music tradition in Russia.  Obviously, choosing just one is hard for me!

Where can people find you?

www.LidiyaConductor.com (where you can also sign up for my mailing list!) @LidiyaConductor on FB Twitter, instagram, etc.

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Thank you so much, Lidiya, for this glimpse into your amazing life!

Photos by Kate Lemmon.

A Few Friday Favorites

Happy Friday! From what I can see on Instagram, it looks like winter has FINALLY ended for us all, and the beautiful weather has perked everyone right up.  April showers, it seems, really do bring May flowers.  I’m off to Boston today and will spend the weekend trying out cellos with a student, running the year-end concerts for my chamber music program, and then starting off the year’s annual auditions for the youth orchestra.  My article on taking auditions seems to have resonated with lots of folks-musicians and non-musicians alike.  As one friend who spent her entire career working in HR pointed out–this all applies perfectly to job interviews as well!  If you missed it, you can read it here. For some other fun tidbits that have caught my eye this week, here are a few things I have rounded up for you.

1 Since we are all outside collectively beautifying the world with plants and flowers, check out these great planters.  I love the color palette.

2. May is Cello Month over at Johnson Strings!  This is a great string shop located outside of Boston, but the sale applies to online orders as well!  If you’re in need of cello -specific instruments, gear, music, etc.  You won’t find better deals!

3. Every month, TheEveryGirl posts some free tech backgrounds.  I love starting off a new month with a new desktop photo or screen saver.

4. I used to have to wait until I went to France to pick this stuff up.  Now you can get it without a plane ticket (though, I’m still happy to go to Paris if I absolutely MUST! 😉

5.  This beautiful weather has me thinking about sandals.  Specifically, these sandals.

6. This phone case is gorgeous!  The birds remind me of my friend Colleen.

7. This article on living abroad really resonated with me.  I do love that I get to return to the states so regularly (hello, Amazon!  hello, whole foods! hello, strawberries that don’t cost $16 a pint!) but living elsewhere definitely has it’s perks.

8. OMG, these earrings are the greatest!  I wish they had been around when I first got my ears pierced, and I still want them now, and I want to give them to every young girl I know!

9. Apparently, this is the greatest stuff on the planet and cures everything from stomach problems to stubby eyelashes. Who knew? My formerly long luxurious lashes have turned stubby, so I’ll be picking some of this stuff up asap.

10. Hahaha! McSweeney’s nails the Myers-Briggs test.

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Have a great weekend!

~ Kate

 

A Few Friday Favorites

Happy Weekend, Everyone!  This is the only weekend all month that I will be at home in Bermuda with Paul.  International Race Week is starting up, so P will be out on the water (his happy place).  I’ll be cheering him on, teaching and doing some practice coaching, and catching up on some gardening and reading.  I can’t wait.  I’ll be in Boston the next 3 weekends for various things.  Crazy! Here are a few things I’ve been enjoying lately. If you’re in a browsing mood, take a look.

My friend Miriam turned me onto this podcast, and it is SO interesting!

This rug would be so cute for a back patio or a screened in porch.

She had me at Cardamom

It was a big week for Armenians everywhere.

Apparently, culottes are big this spring.  Thankfully, they are extremely cello-friendly!  I like these, these and these.

This is perfect for picnics in the park, beach bonfire nights, and music festival noshing! It would make an excellent Mother’s Day gift, don’t ya think?

And speaking of Mother’s Day, this mug cracked me up.

What a great gift for a high school graduate!  I love the idea of filling it with starbucks and chipotle gift cards!

The Bahamian Government has just announced a major initiative to ban all single-use plastics from the island by 2020.  Here’s hoping Bermuda (and the rest of the world) follows suit!

I needed to get a new A String when I was in Boston, and they were out of my usuals.  I decided to give this new one a try, and I am totally in love.  Clear, strong, and just right for my instrument.

 

Biking at Grape Bay Beach

Have a great one!  Cheers!

~Kate

 

 

 

Teaching According to The Four Tendencies

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By now we all understand that people have different learning styles.  I’m definitely a visual learner-if I can see it or imagine it, it sticks.  Others find that they learn best if they hear it, or if something is put into a list, etc.  But Gretchen Rubin, whose Happiness Project book provided the inspiration for my own 12-month focus project wrote another book called The Four Tendencies, that takes a look at the 4 different ways people react towards inner and outer expectations.  I’m guessing she didn’t write it with classical music students and teachers in mind, but her theories have been a huge game changer in how I work with my students.

You should read the book, and you can get it here, but the gist of it is that when it comes to meeting deadlines, having self-discipline, and basically living their lives, people gravitate towards 1 of 4 general tendencies: Upholder, Questioner, Obliger or Rebel.

  1. The Upholder: This student is very good at meeting both inner and outer expectations. They are the goody-two-shoes who not only always practice, but always practice exactly what I asked them to practice, exactly how I asked them to practice it.  I can feel confident that if they set a goal for themselves (they want to do a particular competition, or audition for a festival) I won’t need to nag them about the approaching deadline.  These students make us wonder why our other students make things so difficult, and they are the reason that other parents think their kids should quit because they have a hard time getting them to practice.  Upholders make for dreamy students.  As adults, they are a little annoying because nobody should be allowed to be that perfect.  #inmynextlifeiwanttobeanupholder.

 

     2. The Questioner: This student CAN meet both inner and outer expectations, but           only if they have a full understanding of WHY they are doing what is being asked.  This is the student that wants to know what, exactly, that etude is going to do to improve their playing, or why, exactly, going to festival x is better than going to festival y.  when I have identified a student as a questioner, I know that I am going to need to explain everything in great detail, and make sure they understand why something needs to be done.  As far as their practicing goes, they will question whether they should tackle a passage the way I asked them to, and will come to their next lesson saying that they looked it up on youtube and found a different way of doing it, and shouldn’t they maybe do it that way instead?   I used to think that these students were a little annoying.  Why didn’t they just trust that I knew what I was doing?  But now I realize that they do trust me–  It’s just that they need to do research ALWAYS.  FOR EVERYTHING.  As adults, these are the folks who will do a side-by-side comparison of every vacuum cleaner every made before they decide which one to buy.  But they’ll be very happy once they get it.

 

  1. The Obliger: This student can easily meet outer expectations, but has trouble meeting inner ones. This is the student who is so enthusiastic in their lessons, leaves feeling completely inspired that THIS is the week that they are going to turn things around, and have the absolute best of intentions to do everything you have suggested/assigned, but then a week goes by and they have barely touched the instrument.  They haven’t watched that clip on youtube that you told them to watch, and they feel miserable and ashamed.  Thing is, they need to be held accountable for everything, or it doesn’t get done.  This is the track team member that successfully runs and wins races year after year while in school, but then as an adult, can’t get themselves to get out the door and go for a jog (because there is no coach and no team waiting for them).  For my Obliger students, I have them text me at the end of each day and tell me how much they practiced.  Knowing that they are going to have to answer to me at the end of the day seems to do the trick.  They don’t want to have to say “none”.  Other tricks include having them make little videos of their etude or a section of a piece and send it to me every couple of days, etc.  More work on my part, yes, but seeing how proud they are that they didn’t let yet another week go by without making progress makes it all worth it.

 

  1. The Rebel: Oh, the rebel.  Are you imagining a kid in a leather jacket with a nose ring (actually, that was me in high school—maybe I’m a rebel?). This is a bit more subtle than that.  The rebel tendency is when a person can meet inner and outer expectations, but only if it’s what they feel like.  They might practice one thing, but not the other.  You might assign popper 15, but they do Popper 18 instead.  These students, as sweet and enthusiastic as they are, simply have a hard time doing something that someone else has told them to do.  My work-around?  I give these kids multiple options.  I tell them a few different ways they could work on a particular passage or issue, and tell them that they can decide which one works best.  Rebels need to be the ones making the decisions.  I’ll give them the choice of three different etudes (all of which deal with the same thing) and they get to choose which one they want to do.  They feel in charge, and I know that they are doing what I need them to do.

 

If you’re curious about what your tendency might be, you can do this quiz and find out!

Has anyone else read this and applied it to their teaching methods?  I’d love to hear what other “tricks” you have come up with!

Cheers!

Kate

 

My Week in Florida

Hi Everyone,

Sorry I have been a bit MIA as of late.  February was insane, and then March got even crazier.  I’ve missed writing, but then you know how it goes….the longer you wait, the harder it is to get going again.  I realized that I hadn’t even posted about last month’s trip to Florida, so that’s where I’ll start.

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I had planned this week of concerts around South Florida to coincide with Paul’s February School Holidays, so he was able to join me for for the trip.  I had been in Boston for some recording sessions and a concert the week before, so we met up in Miami for a little sight-seeing and relaxation, and then moved our way up and down between Ft. Lauderdale and Palm Beach.  I had a mix of public and private recitals, school workshops and master classes scheduled for the latter half of the week.  Over our 8 days there, we caught up with dear friends, met some new ones, and I got to perform my solo program for a whole bunch of people. We explored the Wynwood area in Miami, checked out the Museum of Science, and went to the New World Symphony Gala.  We walked the Riverwalk in Ft. Lauderdale and hit up the shopping strip in Palm Beach, spent time with my uncle and time at the beach. It was lovely.

But we were also there on Valentine’s Day, and what should have been (especially during marriage month!) our über romantic get-away, ended up being a horrible, horrible, awful, mind-numbing day when 17 innocent kids were gunned down at their own high school a couple of miles from where we were at the time.  Needless to say, it lent a bit of a grayish tint on my memories of the week.  Everyone was distracted.  I showed up to play my concert the following day and they had completely forgotten about me.  I do strongly believe that music heals the soul, but in truth, no one was really in the mood for a concert, least of all me.  The concerts all happened (except one, but that’s a whole different story….!) but we were all walking around in a bit of a daze–at times pretending that everything was fine, and at other times, depressed and uninterested in doing anything at all.

It was, however, good to be in some warmer weather, and as I mentioned, we got to spend time with relatives and dear old friends – some of whom I had not seen in over a decade.  We ate delicious meals and went on romantic walks. I got to see Paul get excited over geeky things at the science museum and he got to catch a glimpse into my former life in Miami Beach.

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So, there you have it.  It was a strange and bizarre trip, and while it wasn’t the luxurious get-away I was hoping for, I am so grateful that Paul was there with me.  I’m not sure I could have done it without him.  Logistically and emotionally, I needed him there.  He drove me to concerts so that I wouldn’t arrive exhausted, he chatted up audience members and convinced them to buy cds, and he let me snap at him (sorry!) when I didn’t really know how to answer his questions that were generally along the lines of “what the hell is wrong with your country?” and “Why can’t you guys solve your gun problem the way the rest of the world has?”

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It was in Miami, actually, many moons ago, when Gary Hoffman gave me some advice that I have never forgotten.  When I asked him what it was like to travel around the world as a concert cellist, he looked at me, and said “Well, you just have to accept that 85% of the time you’re going to feel like shit.  You’re going to be jet-lagged, or have a headache, or have caught a cold on the airplane, or some weird thing is going to be going on in your life or around you, but you have to learn how to just show up and do it anyway.”  That week in Florida definitely tested me in a lot of ways, but overall, I think will come away with fond memories of the people I met and got to play for, the talented and enthusiastic students I worked with, of renewed friendships and tender moments. And on Saturday, I will be thinking of all of those people marching in the States, I’ll be going for a long walk around the island in solidarity.

-Kate

A Few Friday Favorites

Happy Friday, Everyone!  I’ve been in Boston this week for some recordings and a concert tonight, and tomorrow I am meeting up with Paul in Miami!  I’m so excited for a week of concerts, masterclasses, some serious beach time, and catching up with some friends and family members who live down there.  Here are a few things I have been enjoying lately.  I hope you will too!

There has been a lot of press lately about the lack of diversity in programming in the Classical Music.  A lot of orchestras are sticking to music by written by dead white guys and playing those pieces over and over again.  Tonight, in Jordan Hall (Boston), Boston Modern Orchestra Project is dedicating an entire concert to the music of Joan Tower in honor of her 80th birthday.  This lady is amazing, and I have loved being fully immersed in her lush sound-world this week.  Click here for ticket information for tonight’s show, and here’s a little preview.

This black blouse is so pretty, and would make for perfect  “concert black”.

I might be slightly obsessed with houseplants, and these are some of my favorites for adding a little cheer to a room.

I am halfway through this book, and I am loving it.  I can’t wait to read the next two!

I loved this collection of comments and ideas regarding friendships and the best ways to maintain them.

We’re halfway through winter, and this sweater is going to keep me warm for the remaining weeks.  (except next week, because FLORIDA!). And it’s on sale now!

Did you watch the launch of Falcon Heavy this week?  Here’s a great interview with Elon Musk and Bill Nye on the future of space flight.  The actual launch starts at around 5:12.  It’s pretty fantastic.

Guys, I got a jump rope for Christmas, and I LOVE it.  I use it just about every day, and it is so fun, but also a great workout.  whenever I come back from a walk or a run, I just do some jumps in my driveway.  It definitely gets the heart pumping!

Living in my joggers lately, and these beauties are seriously on sale right now.

Yesterday was John Williams’s Birthday!  So here’s a little something to honor of him, and today’s opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Pyeonchang.

img_2608Have a terrific weekend!

cheers,

-Kate

My February Focus

 

If you have been following along on my plan to focus each month on a particular aspect of my life, you’ll know that I have already done “Health”, “Career”, “BYSO”-one aspect of my professional life, “Home”, and “Blogging”.  Some months were super clear and easy, and others were a bit more difficult and abstract than I thought they would be. God knows I have already had some wrenches thrown into the works (umm, hello computer dying in the middle of “career” month and losing some very valuable work information…oops.).  But I am so happy to say that at the end of every single month, I have been able to point to a list of things I accomplished that improved that focus area, and that every single month, I have come away feeling like I have learned a few important things, and have created some sustainable habits that will help continue the progress.   I am excited to keep going with this plan, but to be perfectly honest, I am a little apprehensive about this month’s focus: Marriage.

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At the beginning of this 12-Month Focus Project, I drew up a list of the 12 most important areas of my life, and then set about assigning a particular month to each area– trying to choose the month that makes the most sense.  I was feeling the need hit “reset” on my body after a long summer, so I made September “Health” month, and since I will be seeing lots of family in July, that gets “Family” month.  But “Marriage”? well, there IS Valentine’s Day, and I booked my week of concerts in Florida for his half-term break so that he can join me and make it a working holiday.  But otherwise, it’s a bit arbitrary.  On one hand, we’ve only been married for a couple of years.  We are definitely still newlyweds.  On the other hand, my marriage is one of THE MOST important things in my life, and I want to cherish and nurture it.  In other words, I am more than happy to devote a month to focusing on my marriage, but it’s not like we need any kind of major overhaul.  There are no big issues to resolve, and we don’t have kids, so we already get to spend a lot of quality time alone together.  So, what should I do?

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I decided to take a cue from one of my original inspirations for this whole project: Gretchen Rubin’s The Happiness Project.  She devoted a month to her marriage as well, and this was her list:

  • Quit nagging
  • Don’t expect praise or appreciation
  • Fight right
  • No dumping
  • Give proofs of love

 

Sounds about right.  I’ll start with these and add any others that come up.   At the very least, at the end of the day (er…month) Paul will be one very happy husband!  Wish me luck!

-Kate

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Friday Favorites

Is it Friday already?  It’s February (thank god!) but that also means it is booking season for us musicians, and the month when we all set out to book our concerts for NEXT season.  It’s all a bit fast and furious, and the week just flew by!  This weekend will be spent catching up on some other work (and a new blog post).  Grabbing our Friday Night fish n’ chips dinner at the Yacht Club, and digging around in my garden.  Oh, and I hear there is a little football game on Sunday.  Go Pats! Here are a few things to entertain you over the weekend.  Have a great one, everybody!

-Kate

If you’re in Boston this weekend, go check out this concert!

This would be a fun dress to wear in Miami (we’ll be there over valentine’s day, afterall)

I’m falling in love with this all-natural skin care line from Vermont. It even smells good!

Paul and I can’t stop watching this show.  We are ALL IN

This would make the coziest Valentine’s Day gift!

Of course, so would this… 😉

These gorgeous dishes are indestructible.

This girl was once one of my Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras cellists, and I am so proud of what she is accomplishing these days. She’s on fire!

Have a listen to this.  Beautiful, right?

I’m excited to eat here when we’re in Miami next week. What a great concept!

In case you are in need of some Super Bowl snack recipes, here are a few ideas.

And speaking of the Super Bowl.  Who said, classical musicians and sports don’t mix?

Kate with bikes

A Few Friday Favorites

What are you up to this weekend?  I just got back from a week in Boston, and am so happy to be back home.  We’re having some friends over for “game night” tonight, because Paul and I are very very late to this party.  Otherwise, Paul will be working on the boat and I will be spending some quality time with my cello and my garden.  I’m also going to try to get a nice long run in (god help me!) and maybe do a crossword or two.  Here are a few things that I am loving right now, check them out:

cheers!

-Kate

I am getting ready to set up a home office in my studio, and I have my eye on this desk:

All hail the great Ina Garten.  Thank you for saying this so simply and clearly.

I have been drooling over this dreamy concert dress. Also, this one, and this one.

How to lunch like a boss.

If you’re looking to expand your classical music library, Rachel Barton’s new Elgar CD just came out.  If you want something with a bit more edge, check out BMOP’s latest release (I’m on it!)

Do you have a favorite podcast?  I’ve been listening to this one for a while now, and these sisters crack me up!

I’m heading to Florida in two weeks, and I love the back on this bathing suit.

I finally finished this book, and it was as good as everyone said it would be.

A9D1E177-46AD-488F-926F-75C118588596Have a wonderful and relaxing weekend!